Kim Kardashian steals looks on her sister’s birthday with this batgirl-style outfit

EFE Latam Videos

The surreal bursts into Freud’s house a century after their first meeting

Vienna, Jul 1 (EFE).- Sigmund Freud declared himself incapable of understanding surrealism when its founder, André Breton, tried to get him to embrace that artistic movement. A century after the meeting between the two, more than a hundred surrealist works hang in the old Viennese home of the “father of psychoanalysis”. Titled “Surreal! The imagination of new realities”, this exhibition, open until October 16, reflects on an unusual, asymmetrical and tense relationship, on the one hand; lasting, undoubtedly fruitful and today historic, on the other. The works of more than 50 exponents and precursors of surrealism, including Salvador Dalí, Max Ernst, Pablo Picasso, Man Ray, Hans Bellmer, Giorgio de Chirico, Yves Tanguy or Meret Oppenheim, belonging to the Klewan private collection, are presented here as fruits of the strong influence of psychoanalysis. Key piece and common thread of historical reflection is, above all, the long correspondence between Freud and Breton. The letters, some of them original, are displayed in a glass case next to magazines and publications of the surrealist movement. MISSED BERGGASSE 19 Precisely the place of the exhibition, the Sigmund Freud Museum in the famous address of Berggasse 19, cradle of the science of the unconscious, is where that interaction between art and psychoanalysis began that lasted almost two decades. It began here, in 1921, with the only meeting between a 25-year-old Breton, and his admired “great Viennese sage”, 65. And it ended in 1938, when Salvador Dalí, after an unsuccessful attempt in Vienna, is received by the already octogenarian Freud at his home in London, where he had taken refuge from Nazi persecution, a year before he died. The Viennese home where the famous thinker lived and worked for 47 years became “a place of longing” for Breton and Dalí, since Freud “placed the dream here at the center of his research”, highlights the director of the museum, Monika Pessler . ENTHUSIASM VS SKEPTICISM “Despite the fact that I receive so many proofs of the interest that you and your friends have in my research, I myself am not capable of clarifying what Surrealism is and what it wants,” the author of Surrealism wrote to Breton in December 1932. “The interpretation of dreams”. In this way, he alluded not only to the multiple manifestations of an enthusiastic admiration for the surrealists, but also to the innumerable references to psychoanalysis with which they laid the pillars of the young artistic movement. “Breton and his initial circle of literary figures, who formed in Paris at the beginning of the twenties, lean on Freud”, whom they attribute to having uncovered a deep layer of the human being, and embrace, above all, his theories on the sleep and the unconscious, recalls the exhibition’s curator, Daniela Finzi. However, new creations, neither literary nor plastic, mean anything to Freud, and he confesses that he likes the great classics. This does not prevent them from maintaining an interesting epistolary exchange and Breton continuing to send him dedicated works. Freud, although always very respectful, makes it clear in his letters that he does not understand the interpretation that artists make of his postulates, which is why he rejects Breton’s request to contribute to a book on dreams in 1937. Breton reacted by citing that rejection in his volume, and a year later he would write “Long live Freud, the great Viennese sage!” in his “Dictionnaire abrégé du Surréalisme”. UTOPIA VS PRAGMATISM “For Freud, the dream is the starting point, while for the surrealists it is the end. artistic. “The surrealists wanted a utopia, a fusion of reality with the unconscious, freedom from reason,” he notes. But as a doctor, Freud was “very pragmatic.” With his analytical work he sought to give more space to the use of reason and reduce the suffering of his patients in the reality that they had to live. And what would he say when he saw the dream images that now hang on the walls of his former living room and dining room? Pessler responds convinced that today he would give his approval to the exhibition, since the pieces are of great historical relevance and Freud “was always very interested in history.” In addition, he adds, his encounter with Dalí did not leave him cold: in a letter to the writer Stefan Zweig he expressed his amazement at the passionate temperament of the Catalan artist and said that he would have been interested in “analytically investigating the genesis” of his work . Wanda Rudich (c) Agencia EFE

We would love to say thanks to the writer of this short article for this remarkable material

Kim Kardashian steals looks on her sister’s birthday with this batgirl-style outfit